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Torquay has been a popular holiday destination for Victorians since the early 1900s and its beaches have been modelled on those of England with wide grassy foreshores and large shady trees lining the coast. Scenic walking tracks extend through much of the town's foreshore, and good views can be enjoyed from Yellow Bluff and at Point Danger with its Anzac Memorial perched high above the ocean on the headland.
Torquay has long been associated with the surfing industry and this is evident with the number of manufactures and retailers of surfing related goods that line the main highway through the town. The largest concentration of those can be found at Surf City Plaza which is also home to the Australian National Surfing Museum - the world's largest surfing and beach culture museum.
Torquay is the official start of the Great Ocean Road - one of Australia's most spectacular coastal drives which covers over 200 kilometres of the south-western Victorian coast, passing through areas such as the scenic Otway Ranges and the rugged Shipwreck Coast west of Cape Otway.

Separated by the Barwon River from its twin coastal town of Barwon Heads. Being the largest town outside of Geelong on the Bellarine Peninsula, Ocean Grove offers a wide selection of shopping facilities, restaurants, cafes and speciality shops, spread between the main shopping strip near the coast along The Terrace and the Ocean Grove Marketplace to the north on Shell Road.
Coastal attractions include the surf beaches which front Bass Strait and several walking tracks that offer good views along the beach.
The focal point on Ocean Grove's main surf beach is the Dunes Cafe & Bar, next to the Surf Life Saving Club, which is surrounded by lawns, native gardens and bollards carved and painted into people depicting the life and times of the area. The Barwon River, near the river mouth, offers safe and sheltered swimming along its sandy shoreline, while further upstream is a jetty and boat ramp.
Much of Ocean Grove is spread over the undulating hills and valleys which characterise this section of the Bellarine Peninsula, giving good views down to the ocean and of the surroundings.
Blue Waters Lake and the Begola Wetlands are two major inland water attractions at the bottom of the town's valleys, featuring walking tracks and a collection of birdlife.

Nestled between the mouth of the Barwon River and the roaring surf of Thirteenth Beach, Barwon Heads has a dream position with a mix of gentle estuary, rocky coastal headland and ocean beaches.
Families swim in the shallows of the inlet after a solid session at the playground, while serious surfers spend time at nearby 13th Beach where the waves pound in from Bass Strait.
Relax, unwind and enjoy the slower pace of Barwon Heads, a popular destination at the mouth of the Barwon River. Soak up the coastal scenery all year round and find a beach for every occasion, from renowned surf breaks to river beaches and snorkelling grounds. Wander along the white sand, while away the day in friendly cafes, and work on your swing at some of the finest golf courses in the state.
Play a round at some of the country's best golf courses on the Bellarine Peninsula. Studded with superbly sculpted, five-star courses, Barwon Heads is home to three of Australia's Top 50 public access courses. Enjoy stunning architecture and ocean views, sea air and friendly wildlife.

There's more to Lorne than just the beach. The mountainous and bushy Otway Ranges form an attractive backdrop to Lorne, with the Great Otway National Park offering many bushwalking tracks. The spectacular Erskine Falls are located within the park, just 8 kilometres west of town.

Lorne is a very popular beach tourist resort town, located on one of the state's most scenic coastal routes, the Great Ocean Road, between Aireys Inlet and Wye River.

Cafes and boutiques line the main foreshore thoroughfare of Mountjoy Parade, creating a Mediterranean feel to the area. Lorne's wide foreshore area extends from the shops on Mountjoy Parade down to the patrolled sandy beach areas. Further south at Point Grey is the jetty where the annual Lorne Pier to Pub open water swim is held, attracting national interest. Sheltered swimming is available at the mouth of the Erskine River where a long suspension bridge crosses this waterway and the sandy beach below.

Good views of the area can be enjoyed from Teddys Lookout, at the southern end of George Street. The upper and lower lookouts offer views inland as well as south along the coast and down to the point where the Great Ocean Road crosses the George River at its mouth. Views of the town and its main beach can be experienced from several of the picnic spots along the Great Ocean Road between the Surf Life Saving Club and Point Grey.

Beach, bush and kangaroos are the ingredients used to make Anglesea a favourite holiday spot. Located 10 minutes west of Torquay on the Great Ocean Road. 
There is more to Anglesea than its fresh clean air and glorious water views. Anglesea is a recognised haven for its abundant flora, particularly rare orchids and native flowers during spring. With attractive parks and gardens, Anglesea is also renowned for its wildlife, particularly the kangaroos. Take an hour (or a day) to explore the spectacular Surf Coast Walk - it showcases the beautiful coastal landscape of the region and the untouched natural beauty. The Anglesea Golf Course is the place to meet the real locals, with beautiful kangaroos coming out to graze at dusk and dawn. It is a beautiful sight to see.
Anglesea is a particularly significant town on the Great Ocean Road as it marks the first spot south-west of the road's official start at Torquay where it meets the coast.
Patrolled surf and swimming beaches surrounded by beautiful forest and coastal scenery make Anglesea a popular tourist resort with the vast expanse of sand surrounding the mouth of the Anglesea River being a popular spot for swimmers. Other scenic spots along the coast include the rocky Point Roadknight and the lookouts off Harvey Street and the Great Ocean Road above the town's main surf beach.
Attractive parks and gardens line the coastal foreshore and the Anglesea River, with Coogoorah Park at the end of River Reserve Road featuring a network of islands linked by boardwalks and bridges through wetlands.